• Oracle v. Google: Protecting Software Development, Not Destroying It

    Many articles are coming out about how the recent decision in Oracle America v. Google is going to destroy the ability to create and protect software in the United States. The latest doomsday prophet is Jie Lian in his IPWatchdog article entitled Oracle v. America: Fair or Unfair. As a longtime programmer and an expert in software copyright law, I can tell you that the Federal Circuit got it right, and the decision helps software developers and encourages software development because it leaves…

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  • Federal Circuit Vacates PTAB’s Determination of CBM Patent After Appeal by Apple and Google

    On Wednesday, July 11th, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit issued a decision in Apple v. ContentGuard Holdings vacating a decision by the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) to institute a covered business method (CBM) validity proceeding… Amazingly, the Federal Circuit’s vacature of the PTAB’s determination of unpatentable subject matter came after appeals from petitioners Google and Apple sent the case to the Federal Circuit. Although the panel of administrative patent judges…

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  • IPO Webinar on On-Sale Bar

    The Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO) will offer a one-hour webinar entitled “An Update on the On-Sale Bar: Helsinn at the Supreme Court” on July 19, 2018 from 2:00 to 3:00 pm (ET). John Duffy of the University of Virginia, Jennifer Johnso…

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  • Webinar on Protecting and Licensing University Patents

    Technology Transfer Tactics will be offering a webinar entitled “Protecting and Licensing University Patents in a Post-Oil States and SAS World” on July 25, 2018 from 1:00 to 2:00 pm (ET). Tyson Benson and Doug Robinson of Harness, Dickey & Pierce, PLC and Cheryl Horst and Zane Gernhart of NUtech Ventures will address the following topics: • What the Oil States and SAS decisions mean — the end of partial institution — estoppel after PTAB decisions — impact on licensing • Changes to PTAB rules and procedures the PTO is implementing — ‘usual and customary meaning’ versus ‘broadest reasonable interpretation’…

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  • Webcast on WesternGeco and Lost Profits

    Practising Law Institute (PLI) will be offering a one-hour webcast on “WesternGeco and Lost Profits: Fair Compensation for Domestic Infringement or Extraterritorial Extension of Patent Rights?” on July 24, 2018 beginning at 1:00 pm (Eastern). Douglas R. Nemec of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP will: • Provide a detailed analysis of the Supreme Court’s decision in WesternGeco v. ION Geophysical; • Explore the potential ramifications of the WesternGeco decision for patent damages more generally; and • Examine how WesternGeco fits into the broader scheme of recent Supreme Court patent decisions, as practitioners seek signs of how the Court…

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  • 交差

                            目次はこちら

    交差

    (CROSS)
    $$ In other words, the signal is replotted as a function of sampling time s as determined by the zero crossing detector 78 and not as a fun…

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  • "The Happenings," then and now

    Of the concept of a “happening,” the website artsy.net observes:


    In October 1959, artist and Rutgers professor Allan Kaprow presented 18 Happenings in 6 Parts at the Reuben Gallery in New York’s East Village. Although he had experimented with the form earlier, this marked the first use of the term “Happening.”
    (…)
    The Happenings burned bright and fast, tapering off in 1963 when Kaprow moved on. Grooms and Oldenburg had already left to pursue other projects. News of the novel art form had started to travel—there were “thrill clubs” that came from Long Island to experience the Happenings and, for Oldenburg, the “audience became less and less interesting to me. I couldn’t really reach them.” The term “Happening” became such an accepted part of 1960s vernacular that it was used as a title for a song by girl group The Supremes.

    link: https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-what-were-1960s-happenings-and-why-do-they-matter

    The song referenced by artsy.net, “The Happening,” was the theme song for the 1967 movie “The Happening,” which starred, among others, Faye Dunaway, Anthony Quinn, and George Maharis. Oscar Homolka, frequently cast as a heavy (by Hitchcock in Sabotage, Reward to Finder), also appeared.

    Artsy.net did not mention the musical group The Happenings, comprised of graduates from a high school in Paterson, New Jersey, most notably Bob Miranda. The Happenings were big around 1966-1967. Of relevance to intellectual property, their big hits were cover songs, of previously recorded songs. From wikipedia:


    The band’s original concept and much of its commercial success came as a cover band playing classic songs in a unique style. Said Miranda, the group’s concept was to “take a song that’s already proven it could be a hit and put our spin on it.”

    (…)

    The group’s major hits were “See You In September” (1966), which was originally recorded by The Tempos in 1959, and a cover version of the George Gershwin/Ira Gershwin song, “I Got Rhythm” (1967), updated for the group’s sunshine pop musical style. “See You In September” and “I Got Rhythm” were on the Billboard Hot 100 Singles charts for 14 weeks in 1966 and 13 weeks in 1967, respectively, forming musical bookends for the 1966-1967 school year, based on their Hot 100 #3 peak dates.

    As an update, Bob Miranda & The Happenings appeared at Duke Island Park in Bridgewater, New Jersey on July 8, 2018.

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