• From Discovery to Transfer, Puerto Rico Patents from 1850-1898

    Puerto Rico was discovered by the Spaniards on Nov. 19, 1493, during Columbus’ second voyage. For the next 400 years, it was a Colony of Spain, with two brief interruptions, but with no formal transfer of ‘ownership’. The patent activity with (at the time) a foreign power (the USA) is surprising in the latter parts of the 19th century. This article takes a look at the patents issued by the USPTO to Puerto Rico residents within the period.

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  • Google’s License on Transfer Network: A Good Way to Avoid Patent Trolls?

    Google, along with a number of other companies, started the License On Transfer (LOT) Network on July 9, 2014.  The general purpose of the program is to reduce the risk of being sued by a Patent Assertion Entity (PAE) for network participants.  The danger present for all market participants is that an operating company with patent assets may fall on hard times and have to sell their patents to a PAE or may just choose to do so.  The LOT Network protects its members from suit from patents acquired by PAEs from their members.  Essentially, all parties agree that if one of the patents potentially subject to the license (the network members’ patent portfolios) is transferred to a PAE then the license is effective as to that patent.  This means that the members of the LOT Network are basically immune from an infringement suit under that patent from the PAE once the transfer to a PAE occurs.  The agreement is carefully drafted to exclude “triggering events” from including transfers to non-PAE’s. The agreement can be found, here.  According to a presentation concerning the program, the members of the group have been insulated from at least one transfer of a subject patent to a Japanese PAE. 

    There are currently 325,000 patent assets, including 99,000 US patents subject to the LOT Network.  The current membership of 47 companies includes: 3D Robotics, Inc., AddShoppers, Inc., Asana, Be Labs, Binatone Electronics, Breezy Print, CAN Telematics, Canon, Cinfo Contenidos Informativos Personalizados SL, Civis Analytics, Cloudability, Corvado, Cyclica, Dropbox, Edyt, Emaldo Techonolgies, Enplug, EPHE Corp., Ford Motor Company, GitHub, Google, Great Wave Tech, HLCA Media, Indri, Inductive Automation, JPMorgan Chase Bank, Kairos AR Inc., Khan Academy, Marine Traffic, Mazda Motor Corp., Naehas, Newegg, Pandora Media, Pure Storage, Red Hat, Ring Partner, Rocket Matter, SAASPASS, Sabai Technology, SAP SE, SAS Institute, SilverEdge, Sipree, SolarCity, Theralytics, Uber Technologies, and the Wikipedia Foundation.  This appears to be a particularly attractive option for companies without a lot of patents that may be sued by PAEs.  To join, you only need to pay a reasonable fee based on your companies’ annual revenue.  I suppose one downside is that the value of your patent may be less given that a potential PAE buyer will have fewer entities to sue.  Are there any other downsides? 

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  • Federal Circuit to Wait on Carnegie Mellon Willfulness Case until the Supreme Court Decides Halo and Stryker

    Carnegie Mellon University v. Marvell Tech (Fed. Cir. 2015) [CMUMarvellEnBanc] The Federal Circuit has issued an interesting en banc order in this billion-dollar-case between the university patentee and the storage/chip maker Marvell. The Pennsylvania district court had originally awarded $1.5 billion to the university based upon a judgment of willful infringement. On appeal, however, the […]

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  • Multi-billion dollar industry developing for face and eye recognition systems

    Biosensor technologies, a tech sector which involves the use of devices that can detect and measure biological functions in living things, is set to become a very valuable business in the coming decade. According to a recent report from Frost & Sullivan, the global market for biosensors generated $11.53 billion in revenues during 2014, a figure that the firm expects to rise to $28.78 billion by 2021. According to the Invention Evaluator analysis of smart vision systems the highest…

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  • Final Written Decision Finding Claims Unpatentable and Not Adopting Patent Owner’s Proposed Construction IPR2014-00724

    Takeaway: Optional claim elements do not narrow the claim because they can always be omitted. In its Final Written Decision, the Board found that Petitioner has shown by a preponderance of the evidence that challenged claims 18–31 of the ‘574 … Continue reading

    The post Final Written Decision Finding Claims Unpatentable and Not Adopting Patent Owner’s Proposed Construction IPR2014-00724 appeared first on PTAB Trial Blog.

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